Academic Affairs Office

Philosophy- Course Descriptions

PHIL 101 Basic Concepts of Philosophy- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  A course which presents some of the issues, questions and problems of philosophy and quasi-philosophical thought, as these issues and thoughts are developed by traditional and contemporary philosophers. 

PHIL 102 Principles of Logic- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  A course which aims to give students an understanding of the fundamental forms of rational argument and critical reasoning skills that can be used in a wide range of disciplines and careers.  There will be an examination of deductive and inductive reasoning, as well as formal and informal fallacies to facilitate the art of distinguishing correct from incorrect reasoning. 

PHIL 104 Symbolic Logic- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  No prerequisite.  An introductory course in Symbolic Logic, the most powerful system of deductive logic yet devised.  Includes propositional and predicate logic through identity with an emphasis on natural deduction.  Particularly of value for those interested in computer science, mathematics, logic or philosophy.

PHIL 202 Introduction to Ethics*- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  An inquiry into both the good of the individual person and the good of society.  Two-thirds of the course presents logic and an in-depth analysis of such ethical theories as relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, religion, and contractarianism.  One-third of the course will examine a varying assortment of such applied ethical issues as euthanasia, abortion, distributive justice, sexual ethics, and environmental ethics. 

PHIL 203 Philosophy of Religion*- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  A brief comparative study of the history and content of major world religions followed by philosophical inquiry into the meaning, truth and value of religious phenomena. 

PHIL 204 Biomedical Ethics*- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  Prerequisite: ENG 101.  An inquiry into many ethical problems which are particularly connected to the health care professions, but which are concern to all persons.  Issues studied include: individual responsibility in institutional settings, paternalism, patients' rights, human experimentation, the right to die, abortion and the right to health care in the context of limited societal resources.  About one-third of the course consists of a survey of those issues and results of ethical theory and logic which sharpen perception, reduce confusion and encourage headway.  No prerequisite, but students who have completed Philosophy 202 will be assigned a special research project. 

PHIL 205 Business Ethics*- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  One-third of this course presents basic ethical theory and logic which together facilitate a deeper understanding of ethical problems.  The second third covers those ethical problems that are apt to confront the business person directly and frequently.  The final thrid of the course is an inquiry into broader ethical problems confronting business and society. 

PHIL 207 Environmental Ethics*- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  One third of this course presents basic ethical theory and logic that together facilitate a deeper understanding of ethical problems.  Two-thirds of the course will explore issues in environmental ethics such as various attitudes toward nature, individual and public policy choices that affect animals, and the proper role of science and technology in an environmentally sensitive world. 

PHIL 210 World Religions*- 3 Cr. Hrs. - 3 Contact Hrs.  In this course the student will attempt to understand and critically analyze the world's major religions and how they impact societies and individuals.  The religions covered are: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Sikhism. Other topics that may be covered are religious movements and the impact of religion on world culture and society, Native American religion. 

*Denotes course that contains an International Component.