Experiential Learning

The Center for Experiential Learning  is part of Muskegon Community College’s commitment toward providing students and community members with collaborative educational opportunities featuring experiential learning pedagogy.

We are excited to share the numerous opportunities and excursions with the greater West Michigan community. The 2016 calendar year is the perfect time to broaden your horizons by attending a public lecture or participating in an excursion to share the history of our lives.

Learn about the positive impact on students who participated in MCC’s Spring Chicago and Dearborn trips:

 

‘Let Freedom Ring’ Series in Spring Lake Explores 1960s Civil Rights Movement

MCC Social Sciences Department is presenting a three-part series entitled “Let Freedom Ring!” which explores the 1960s Civil Rights movement and features Lyndon B. Johnson, Lady Bird Johnson and John F Kennedy.

All the talks, which are free and open to the public, begin at 7 p.m. and will be held at Spring Lake District Library, 123 E. Exchange St., Spring Lake, MI.

Tuesday, Jan. 17
“Let Freedom Ring: the Right to Protest”
Presenter: MCC Instructor Kurt Troutman.

Tuesday, Feb. 21
“Let Freedom Ring: The Catalyst for Change”
Presenter: Peggy Maniates, curator of the USS Silversides Museum

Tuesday, March 21
“Let Freedom Ring: Whistle Stop Tour for Civil Rights”
Presenter: MCC Instructor George Maniates

For more information, contact the MCC Social Sciences Department at (231) 777-0380.

Tour Henry Ford Museum and Ford Assembly Plant in Dearborn March 31

On Friday, March 31, 2017 join us on a tour of two select historical institutions located in Dearborn, MI the Henry Ford Museum and the Ford Assembly Plant.

Our focal visit will be the Henry Ford Museum, founded and funded by one of the most prominent industrialists in the United States. The Henry Ford Museum is one of the premier museums in the nation. With a focus on the industrial revolution and the transformation on the American economy, we will explore how America was transformed in the late 1800s and 1900s. See automobiles, machines and furniture from the last 200 years on our visit.

No visit to Dearborn would be complete without a stop at the Ford Assembly Plant. We will take a factory tour of the plant where the Ford F-150 truck is assembled. You will experience the fabrication and assembly of the most popular pickup truck in the USA.  This will give you a better appreciation for the economic strength of the auto industry and its impact on our state of Michigan.

The $85 cost of the trip will cover your motor coach travel and admission fees to the museums. The only additional cost is your meals. Pay for your trip in the Social Sciences Office in Room 242. Cash, checks or credit/debit cards are accepted.

MCC and Fr. Phil Legacy Project Hosting Winter Film Festival at Harbor Cinema

Muskegon Community College and the Fr. Phil Legacy Project are co-hosting the 2017 Winter Film Festival at Harbor Cinema, 1937 Lakeshore Dr., in Muskegon.

Seven different films will be shown on Sunday afternoons with a pre-film discussion of each. Doors open at the theater at 3 p.m. with a pre-film discussion at 3:15 p.m.  Show times will be at 3:30 p.m.  Tickets are $7 each or $42 for the entire series. To purchase tickets, please call (231) 777-0380.

For more information, contact the MCC Social Sciences Department at (231) 777-0380.

The films and dates are:

Casablanca

Sunday, January 29, 2017
Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz and based on Murray Burnett and Joan Alison’s unproduced stage play Everybody Comes to Rick’s. The film stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid; it also features Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson. Set during World War II, it focuses on an American expatriate who must choose between his love for a woman and helping her Czech Resistance leader husband escape the Vichy-controlled city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis. Casablanca went on to win three Academy Awards – Best Picture, Director (Curtiz) and Adapted Screenplay (the Epsteins and Koch) – and gradually its reputation grew. I

Singing in the Rain

Sunday, February 5, 2017
Singin’ in the Rain is a 1952 American musical comedy film directed and choreographed by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen, starring Kelly, Donald O’Connor, and Debbie Reynolds. It offers a lighthearted depiction of Hollywood in the late 1920s, with the three stars portraying performers caught up in the transition from silent films to “talkies.” It topped the AFI’s Greatest Movie Musicals list and is ranked as the fifth-greatest American motion picture of all time in its updated list of the greatest American films in 2007.

Brother Sun, Sister Moon

Sunday, February 19, 2017
Brother Sun, Sister Moon is a 1972 film directed by Franco Zeffirelli and starring Graham Faulkner and Judi Bowker. The film is an examination of the life of Saint Francis of Assisi. Featuring Zeffirelli’s signature lush photography in Brother Sun, Sister Moon indicates that it was conceived and executed in much the same visual manner as his Academy Award-winning adaptation of Romeo and Juliet (1968). The film attempts to draw parallels between the work and philosophy of Saint Francis and the ideology that underpinned the worldwide counterculture movement of the 1960s and early ’70s. The film is also known for the score composed by Riz Ortolani.

Black Robe

Sunday, February 26, 2017
Black Robe is a 1991 film directed by Bruce Beresford. The screenplay was written by Irish Canadian author Brian Moore, who adapted it from his novel of the same name. Set in New France in 1634 (in the period of conflicts known as the Beaver Wars), the film begins in the settlement that will one day become Quebec City. Jesuit missionaries are trying to encourage the local Algonquin Indians to embrace Christianity, with thus far only limited results. Samuel de Champlain, founder of the settlement, sends Father LaForgue, a young Jesuit priest, to find a distant Catholic mission in a Huron village. The film won the Genie Award for Best Canadian Film and Best Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor (Schellenberg), Art Direction, Cinematography; Golden Reel Award; and Australian Film Institute – Cinematography. Black Robe was praised as a “magnificently staged combination of top talents delivering a gripping and tragic story”, and has been rated one of the most meticulously researched representations of indigenous life put on film. Notably, the film includes dialogue in the Cree, Mohawk, and Algonquin languages. The French characters speak English in the film. Latin is used for Catholic prayers.

The Graduate

Sunday, March 19, 2017
The Graduate is a 1967 American comedy-drama film directed by Mike Nichols. It is based on the 1963 novel The Graduate by Charles Webb, who wrote it shortly after graduating from Williams College. The screenplay is by Calder Willingham and Buck Henry, who appears in the film as a hotel clerk. The film tells the story of 21-year-old Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman), a recent college graduate with no well-defined aim in life, who is seduced by an older woman, Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft), and then proceeds to fall in love with her daughter Elaine (Katharine Ross). In 1996, The Graduate was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” Initially, the film was placed at number 7 on AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Movies list in 1998. When AFI revised the list in 2007, the film was moved to number 17.

American Graffiti

Sunday, March 26, 2017
American Graffiti is a 1973 American coming-of-age comedy-drama film directed and co-written by George Lucas starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ronny Howard, Paul Le Mat, Harrison Ford, Charles Martin Smith, Cindy Williams, Candy Clark, Mackenzie Phillips, Bo Hopkins, and Wolfman Jack. Suzanne Somers and Joe Spano have cameos. Set in Modesto, California in 1962, the film is a study of the cruising and rock and roll cultures popular among the post–World War II baby boom generation. The film is told in a series of vignettes, telling the story of a group of teenagers and their adventures over a single evening. The genesis of American Graffiti was in Lucas’ own teenage years in early 1960s Modesto. In 1995, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

El Cid

Sunday, April 2, 2017
El Cid is a 1961 historical epic film, a romanticized story of the life of the Christian Castilian knight Don Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, called “El Cid” (from the Arabic as-sidi, meaning “The Lord”), who, in the 11th century, fought the North African Almoravides and ultimately contributed to the unification of Spain. The film stars Charlton Heston in the title role and Sophia Loren as Doña Ximena.

 

Interested in receiving updates about upcoming MCC Experiential learning opportunities? Complete the online form below!

Experiential Learning Opportunities