Carr-Fles Planetarium

Thanks to the generosity of the Reach for the Stars campaign donors, you can experience the all-new Carr-Fles Planetarium, West Michigan’s only free planetarium, on the Muskegon Community College campus.

Features: State-of-the-art digital projection, sound and lighting systems. An all-new library of shows. Modern theater seating. New domed ceiling.

Admission: Free and open to the public. There are 44 theater seats and 5 spaces for those using wheelchairs. No reservations are needed.

Showtimes: 7 p.m. Doors open for seating by 6:45 p.m. and the show will begin as soon as the auditorium is full. All shows are approximately 35 minutes and include a brief demonstration of the current star positions.

When: Tuesdays and Thursdays, Late August through June

Location: Muskegon Community College main campus – Room 135, 221 S. Quarterline Rd., Muskegon, MI

Parking: Free

Want to donate for acquiring new programs at Carr-Fles Planetarium? Click here.

Want to schedule a private showing?
Private shows, for groups of 15-44 or more during the day and 20 or more during the evening, may be reserved by calling (231) 777-0289. Teachers or group chaperones are encouraged to select one of the appropriate titles and schedule their visit two to three weeks in advance.

View the complete list of planetarium shows available for private shows

2017-18 Planetarium Shows

Solar Superstorms posterSolar Superstorms

August 29 – October 31, 2017

A fury is building on the surface of the Sun – high-velocity jets, a fiery tsunami wave that reaches 100,000 kilometers high, rising loops of electrified gas. What’s driving these strange phenomena? How will they affect planet Earth? Find the answers as we venture into the seething interior of our star.Solar Superstorms is a major new production that takes viewers into the tangle of magnetic fields and superhot plasma that vent the Sun’s rage in dramatic flares, violent solar tornadoes, and the largest eruptions in the solar system: Coronal Mass Ejections. The show features one of the most intensive efforts ever made to visualize the inner workings of the sun. This is a 35-minute presentation.

Mystery of the Christmas StarChristmas Show: Mystery of the Christmas Star

November 2 – December 14, 2017
(No show on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23)

This modern look at the Christmas story is an annual favorite. As we look at significant astronomical events visible in the sky in the time of Jesus’ birth, we’ll see which of the “sky signs” was remarkable enough to have caused the Wise Men to travel over 600 miles through the desert from Babylon to Bethlehem, and investigate possible dates for the sighting of the “star” which lead them to Jesus.

This is a 35-minute presentation.

Faster Faster than Light!Than Light! The Dream of Interstellar Flight

January 16 – March 1, 2018 and March 13-29, 2018
(Closed March 6 and March 8 for College Spring Break)

The impulse to strike out into the unknown, to see what’s over the horizon is as old as humanity. Today, a whole new horizon beckons. Scientists now believe that our galaxy is filled with solar systems, including up to 9 billion Sun-like stars with planets similar to Earth. Astronomers are racing to find habitable worlds, including any that might exist in the neighborhood of our Sun. But if we find one, how will we ever get there? How long will it take? What rocket designs might one day conquer the voids of space? Faster Than Light! The Dream of Interstellar Flight will dazzle audiences with virtual rides aboard spacecraft of the future. This is a 35-minute presentation.

Incoming! PosterIncoming!

April 3-May 3, 2018 and May 22-June 7, 2018
(Closed May 8-17 for break between semesters)

Tag along with robot explorers zooming past rocky asteroids and icy comets, all the way to Pluto, and discover how asteroids and comets have collided with our planet throughout history, changing the course of life on Earth. Narrated by George Takei, this 2016 program gives audiences a closer look at the scientific advances that may allow us to find and track cosmic threats before they reach planet Earth.This is a 35-minute presentation.